Anthropologists at Dartmouth: Dr. Vanessa Diaz

Vanessa Diaz is a César Chávez Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Latin American, Latino and Caribbean Studies. She has a Ph.D. in Anthropology, and is an interdisciplinary ethnographer, filmmaker, and journalist. Dr. Diaz is currently teaching FILM 46.01 for the Film & Media Studies domestic study program in LA. In order to make the course more hands-on and oriented around professional development and networking for the students while they are in LA, she has an extensive list of guest speakers coming to her class. The guest speakers range from Hollywood writers, producers, directors, actors, reality television show contestants, entertainment reporters, celebrity photographers, scholars of Hollywood/entertainment.  Last week, the class had their first guest speaker, TV writer, actor, and producer Julia Ahumada Grob.  The next guest speakers are Tanya Hong, Associate Director, Digital Accounts at Fox (Film, TV, and Sports) and celebrity photographer Edwin Blanco, Raheem Dawson, Senior Manager of Production for NBC On-Air Promotion, and Jose Toscano, Story Producer at Stone & Company Entertainment. And her list goes on!

Quote of the Day - 01/26/18 Chelsey Kivland

"We believe that leaders must recognize that environmental policy is health policy. Rollbacks of environmental regulations will cause far greater consequences on health, in the U.S. and globally, than any health care bill," write Chelsey Kivland, assistant professor of anthropology, and Anne Sosin, manager of the Dickey Center's Global Health Initiative Program, in an opinion piece.  Read the full article at theconversation.com

* Homepage feature photo:Men in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, collect water on Nov. 11, 2017. Years after Hurricane Matthew nearly devastated Haiti, its vulnerability only increases. Reuters/Martinez Casares

Series on Environmental Archaeology - Lunchtime talks

The Department of Anthropology is pleased to present A Series on Environmental Archaeology. The fourth of five lectures will take place over lunch on February 1st at 12:30p in Haldeman 031.

"Environmental Archaeology and Late Holocene Lifeways of Southwest Madagascar"

Kristina Douglass
Asst. Professor of Anthropology
The Pennsylvania State University

Lunch will be provided by Anthropology and catered by Panera.

Series on Environmental Archaeology - Lunchtime talks

The Department of Anthropology is pleased to present A Series on Environmental Archaeology. The third of five lectures will take place over lunch on January 18th at 12:30p in Haldeman 031.

“The Effects of Climate Change on the Diet of Great Plains Paleoindians”

Erik Otárola-Castillo
Asst. Professor, Department of Anthropology
Purdue University

Artist Jerry Rosembert Moïse Live Demonstration of Work

Friday, January 12, 2018, 10:00am to 3:00pm at Main Hall of Baker Library

Jerry Rosembert Moïse's murals color Haiti’s urban landscape with images of everyday people grappling with the harsh realities of life in the impoverished country. But if his subject matter is misery, his subjects are not miserable. He showcases urban Haitians combating and cunningly navigating the most difficult challenges—disaster, insecurity, illiteracy, aid dependency, corruption, poverty—with courage, poise, and humor. At the same time his murals critique Haitian society, they also valorize the Haitian spirit, featuring strong, smart, and witty characters that invoke viewers’ sympathies and respect simultaneously. Situated at the intersection of Haitian traditions of popular art, Caribbean models of humor and caricature, and graffiti practices common in the urban African diaspora, Jerry’s murals present a new movement of public art as a form of social critique in Haiti.

Series on Environmental Archaeology - Lunchtime talks

The Department of Anthropology is pleased to present A Series on Environmental Archaeology. The second of five lectures will take place over lunch on January 11th at 12:30p in Haldeman 125.

Spontaneity and Order in the Agricultural Hinterland of the Ancient North Coast of Peru

Ari Caramanica
PhD Candidate
Harvard University

Series on Environmental Archaeology - Lunchtime talks

The Department of Anthropology is pleased to present A Series on Environmental Archaeology. The first of five lectures will take place over lunch on January 4th at 12:30p in Haldeman 125.

"Empowered Animals, Ritualized Violence, and the Construction of Sacred Landscapes: A View from Teotihuacan, Mexico"

Nawa Sugiyama
Asst. Professor, Sociology and Anthropology
George Mason University

Prof. William W. Fitzhugh IV

William W. Fitzhugh IV has been teaching a course on Arctic cultures, archaeology, and environments at the Department of Anthropology for the past four years. Prof. Fitzhugh graduated from Dartmouth in 1964 in one of the first classes to get anthropology degrees and worked with Professor Elmer Harp in the field in the summer of 1963--where he got his first taste of archaeology. After two years in the U.S. Navy (in North Atlantic Subarctic seas) he took his graduate training at Harvard and graduated in 1970 with a thesis on Labrador archaeology. From there Prof. Fitzhugh went to the Smithsonian as curator of North American Archaeology and have been there ever since, except for seasonal teaching at Dartmouth in the winter. His research has been throughout the circumpolar north, in Labrador, Alaska, Scandinavia, Russia, and Mongolia, and his major interests are the history of Arctic and Subarctic cultures and environments, cross-cultural studies, northern maritime adaptations, origins of Eskimo cultures and art, Basques in North America, and European contacts and influences on northern peoples.

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