News & Events

  • A collection of evening activities on Friday, Nov. 4, including a reception and a student poster session highlighting research on human rights, will kick off the annual Physicians for Human Rights Student Conference being held at the Geisel School of Medicine on Nov. 5. The topic of this year’s conference is Violence Against Difference.

    Saturday’s opening address on structural violence, by Assistant Professor of Anthropology Chelsey Kivland, opens the day of discussions and breakout...

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  • Sharing the Mountain is a project that aims to memorialize the expansive and intricate community that has been established at the Moosilauke Ravine Lodge, by sharing the stories and experiences of Dartmouth students, alumni and community members.

    Throughout the site you will be able to explore a digital oral-histories archive. We invite you to discover stories, photos, videos, and interactive panoramas of the Ravine Lodge. We encourage you...

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  • Gerardo Gutierrez
    Assoc. Professor, Department of Anthropology
    University of Colorado Boulder
    October 14, 2016 – 3:30p – Silsby 312

    Iconographic representations in ceramics, epigraphy, painted codices, and ethnohistorical sources suggest that Mesoamerican acrobacy and games were performed not as mere entertainment, but as “ritual merriment.” By this I mean that game, joy, and laughter were driving forces in the creation of the universe and rested at the core of...

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  • Thomas Gregor
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology
    Vanderbilt University
    September 16 – 3:30p – Silsby 113

    In the heart of Brazil along the Upper Xingu River 19 indigenous ethnic communities live at peace, even though separated by different languages and dialects.  In the midst of war-like cultures in Amazonia and elsewhere, what has sustained this exceptional peace?  This presentation, the culmination of field research among the Mehinaku and other Xingu...

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  • Follow the link below to see a collection of videos produced by the Dartmouth Ethnography Lab in the Anthropology Department at Dartmouth College!

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQjhfJqPiHPAZXmRzBo3ikQ

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  • Professor Dominy, an evolutionary biologist at Dartmouth College, was quoted in The New York Times science article "A 3.2-Million-Year-Old Mystery: Did Lucy Fall From a Tree?". Read the full article here!

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  • A new paper in Science Advances is co-authored by a team of researchers, including Professor Dominy and a former post-doc in the department, Amanda Melin, who is now a Professor at the University of Calgary. The paper reports on the genomes of colugos and pen-tailed treeshrews, and reinforces the hypothesized sister relationship between colugos and primates, a contested grouping called Primatomorpha.

    Check out the paper on Science Advances:

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  • Primates in Antiquity is a one-day multidisciplinary symposium conceived to explore and interpret the iconography of monkeys and apes in antiquity. The symposium will be held August 19, 2016, at Dartmouth College, featuring plenary talks delivered by internationally recognized scholars in the humanities and social and biological sciences. The symposium, sponsored by the Leslie Center for the Humanities, the Hood Museum of Art, and the Department of Anthropology, is free and open to the...

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  • The New Yorker's June 27 Profiles story "Digging For Glory" includes a quote from Anthropology Professor Jeremy DeSilva, who collaborated with Lee Berger, the featured paleoanthropologist of the story. 

    Jeremy DeSilva recalls that when he visited Wits in 2009 Berger offered to open the fossil vault. “A lot of people in our business are petrified to be wrong,” DeSilva told me. “You have to be willing to be wrong. What Lee is doing takes that to...

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  • How primates developed a taste for alcohol

    Not only do some primates actively seek out nectar with the highest alcohol content, according to new research, but those who can handle their drink have an evolutionary edge. Newsday's Julian Keane found out why from Anthropology Professor Nathaniel J.Dominy, co-author of the recent publication "Alcohol discrimination and preferences in two species of nectar-feeding primate" by Sam Gochman '18.

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