News & Events

  • "We believe that leaders must recognize that environmental policy is health policy. Rollbacks of environmental regulations will cause far greater consequences on health, in the U.S. and globally, than any health care bill," write Chelsey Kivland, assistant professor of anthropology, and Anne Sosin, manager of the Dickey Center's Global Health Initiative Program, in an opinion piece.  Read the...

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  • The Department of Anthropology is pleased to present A Series on Environmental Archaeology. The fourth of five lectures will take place over lunch on February 1st at 12:30p in Haldeman 031.

    "Environmental Archaeology and Late Holocene Lifeways of Southwest Madagascar"

    Kristina Douglass
    Asst. Professor of Anthropology
    The Pennsylvania State University

    Lunch will be provided by Anthropology and catered by Panera.

  • The Department of Anthropology is pleased to present A Series on Environmental Archaeology. The third of five lectures will take place over lunch on January 18th at 12:30p in Haldeman 031.

    “The Effects of Climate Change on the Diet of Great Plains Paleoindians”

    Erik Otárola-Castillo
    Asst. Professor, Department of Anthropology
    Purdue University

    The Pleistocene colonization of the Americas is an exceptional context...

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  • Friday, January 12, 2018, 10:00am to 3:00pm at Main Hall of Baker Library

    Jerry Rosembert Moïse's murals color Haiti’s urban landscape with images of everyday people grappling with the harsh realities of life in the impoverished country. But if his subject matter is misery, his subjects are not miserable. He showcases urban Haitians combating and cunningly navigating the most difficult challenges—disaster, insecurity, illiteracy, aid dependency, corruption, poverty—with courage,...

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  • The Department of Anthropology is pleased to present A Series on Environmental Archaeology. The second of five lectures will take place over lunch on January 11th at 12:30p in Haldeman 125.

    Spontaneity and Order in the Agricultural Hinterland of the Ancient North Coast of Peru

    Ari Caramanica
    PhD Candidate
    Harvard University

    Ari Caramanica's research is focused on the sociopolitical impacts of borderland occupation and the...

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  • The Department of Anthropology is pleased to present A Series on Environmental Archaeology. The first of five lectures will take place over lunch on January 4th at 12:30p in Haldeman 125.

    "Empowered Animals, Ritualized Violence, and the Construction of Sacred Landscapes: A View from Teotihuacan, Mexico"

    Nawa Sugiyama
    Asst. Professor, Sociology and Anthropology
    George Mason University

  • William W. Fitzhugh IV has been teaching a course on Arctic cultures, archaeology, and environments at the Department of Anthropology for the past four years. Prof. Fitzhugh graduated from Dartmouth in 1964 in one of the first classes to get anthropology degrees and worked with Professor Elmer Harp in the field in the summer of 1963--where he got his first taste of archaeology. After two years in the U.S. Navy (in North Atlantic Subarctic seas) he took his graduate training at Harvard and...

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  • Prof. Casana demonstrated some new tools of the archaeologist's trade and gave his students the opportunity to discover footprints of razed buildings in the center of Dartmouth's campus.

    Read the Dartmouth News article.

  • Chelsey Kivland, an assistant professor of anthropology at Dartmouth College whose research focuses on street politics and violence in Haiti’s capital city of Port-au-Prince, expressed deep concerns about Monday’s announcement, “mainly because the effects of the earthquake are not temporary,” she said in phone interview on Thursday. “I do understand that TPS is something that’s not supposed to last forever, but at the same time, it’s supposed to expire when the effects of the disaster have...

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  • Drones have made it easier for Dartmouth’s Jesse Casana to do interesting archaeology, including finding things long hidden at the Shaker Village site in Enfield, but there’s a part of him which is just a little bit sorry.

    “It feels like cheating a little,” admitted Casana, a professor of archaeology in the school’s department of anthropology.

    Besides, he misses the kite. “I got really good at flying the kite.”

    Kite? Yes, and balloons, too.

    ...

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