News & Events

  • Racism may not be a disease, exactly. But a growing body of research finds that it has lasting physical and mental effects on its victims.

    Physicist and social justice crusader Albert Einstein once referred to American racism as a "disease of white people." He was speaking metaphorically, but a host of research in recent years has shown that racism, like a disease, can harm the physical health of both its victims and its perpetrators. Now, the results of a national survey find that...

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  • Modern humans give birth in a way quite different from how their primate relatives do it, according to research described in the book "Human Birth: An Evolutionary Perspective" (1987, Aldine Transaction) by Wanda Trevathan. This is likely because of both the unusually large size of the modern human brain and the way a woman's pelvis is positioned for upright walking, Trevathan wrote. Understanding the way in which human childbirth evolved could also shed light on how unique human traits such...

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  • "The Russian era was about paternalistic control, but the Russian goal was not to transform life radically, but to harness the people for economic purposes," Sergei Kan, tells the "New York Times," in an article about the transition from Russian to American possession of Alaska. "With the Americans, it was accompanied with a much more forceful Westernization." Read the full article.

     

  • Check out this new paper by a team of Dartmouth anthropologists: Hunter-gatherer residential mobility and the marginal value of rainforest patches

    Significance

    Hunter-gatherers are notable for their high levels of mobility, but the ecological and social cues that determine the timing of camp movements (residential mobility) are poorly understood. Using models from foraging theory, we found that, for one population of hunter-gatherers, camp movements coincided...

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  • It’s not every day that a couple of college students discover a fossilized piece of bone likely to have come from a 2-million-year-old ancestor. But that’s what Keira Byno ’19, Julia Cohen ’18, and Kathleen Li ’17 did this winter during a three-week field trip to South Africa for their anthropology class, “Experiencing Human Origins and Evolution.”  

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  • BBC's story "Our ancestors were drinking alcohol before they were human" discusses "It is possible to trace the evolution of boozing back to the common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees". Sam Gochman '18, Anthro major, is quoted. 

    Samuel R. Gochman, a student at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, and his team offered aye-ayes a choice of liquid foods made of sugar water and varying concentrations of alcohol (0 to 5%). The...

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  • February 16, 2017 is Anthropology Day!

    It's an opportunity for anthropologists around the globe to share their enthusiasm for the discipline with the people around them

    At Dartmouth, we'll be celebrating the day by opening our labs and offices for demonstrations and discussions about archaeology, biological anthropology, and cultural anthropology. If you can't make one of the open houses, stop by the fourth floor of Silsby Hall for a bite to eat and chat with the faculty about...

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  • Students digging up skeletons of New England mammals in Belchertown State Forest (Massachusetts) in late August of this year. These skeletons have been accessioned into the collections in Prof. DeSilva's laboratory thanks to the work of these students. They are: Ellie McNutt, Cindy...

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  • From the February 2017 issue of National Geographic:

    The story of humanity’s love affair with alcohol goes back to a time before farming—to a time before humans, in fact. Our taste for tipple may be a hardwired evolutionary trait that distinguishes us from most other animals.

    The active ingredient common to all alcoholic beverages is made by yeasts: microscopic, single-celled organisms that eat sugar and excrete carbon dioxide and ethanol, the only potable alcohol....

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  • A new exhibit in the Baker-Berry Library at Dartmouth, Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds, provides a window onto the unique culture and environment of the ‘Roof of the World.’ This exhibit explores the social and religious practices that shape life in Asia’s high mountain environments, explores the political history of the region, and describes some of the encounters between foreigners and Himalayan and Tibetan people over time. The exhibit has been curated by Senior Lecturer Kenneth...

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