News & Events

  • Joseph Blumberg

    Jason Herrmann is a wizard of sorts—an electronic archaeologist. Herrmann’s is the face of the modern archaeologist, revealing the relics of ancient peoples without even planting a shovel in the dirt. The tools of remote sensing—ground-penetrating radar, orbital satellites, magnetometers, and electrical-resistance meters—are his stock in trade.

    Herrmann came to Dartmouth from the University of Arkansas...

    [more]
  • Keith Chapman

    Dartmouth will host a group of distinguished academic and tribal scholars and elders for two panel discussions next week as part of a symposium on the “Collaborative Research in the Study of Native American Cultures.” The symposium serves as the final event celebrating the 40th anniversary of the establishment of the College’s Native American Studies Program.

    “To showcase some of the best collaborative...

    [more]
  • Joseph Blumberg

    Students Go Climbing in the Footsteps of Chimpanzee

    Dartmouth’s Kes Schroer has taken her students on an unusual adventure “in order to put themselves into the mind of a chimpanzee,” she says. “Chimpanzees provide a critical counterpoint for understanding the potential uniqueness of human behaviors.

    Taking experiential learning to new heights, Schroer shepherded...

    [more]
  • Joseph Blumberg

    Adventures in Archaeology

    Professor of Anthropology Deborah Nichols’ approach to education transcends the classroom. “For most students, college offers the first opportunity to take courses about archaeology,” she says. “For some, doing archaeology in the field will be a transformative experience. They learn to dig with trowels, toothbrushes, and lasers while having a legitimate excuse to get dirty.”

    ...

    [more]
  • Joseph Blumberg

    Adventures in Archaeology

    Professor of Anthropology Deborah Nichols’ approach to education transcends the classroom. “For most students, college offers the first opportunity to take courses about archaeology,” she says. “For some, doing archaeology in the field will be a transformative experience. They learn to dig with trowels, toothbrushes, and lasers while having a legitimate excuse to get dirty.”

    ...

    [more]
  • Joseph Blumberg

    Adventures in Archaeology

    Professor of Anthropology Deborah Nichols’ approach to education transcends the classroom. “For most students, college offers the first opportunity to take courses about archaeology,” she says. “For some, doing archaeology in the field will be a transformative experience. They learn to dig with trowels, toothbrushes, and lasers, while having a legitimate excuse to get dirty.”

    ...

    [more]
  • For a group of recent graduates, the transition from college to the workforce means moving from the ranks of Dartmouth undergraduates to Dartmouth staff members.

    Eight alumni began work last month as Presidential Fellows for the 2013-2014 academic year. The Presidential Fellows Program, run by the Office of the President, was launched in 2009 and provides graduates with the opportunity to play key roles in Dartmouth’s administration...

    [more]
  • The New York Times highlights the work of Dartmouth’s Sergei A. Kan in a story about amateur photographer Vincent Soboleff, a Russian-American who captured images of the Tlingit community of Alaska during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

    Kan, a professor anthropology and of Native American studies, is the author of the new book A Russian American Photographer in Tlingit Country: Vincent...

    [more]
  • New York Daily News reports on a study by Dartmouth’s Lauren Gulbas that found the increase of cosmetic surgery in Venezuela had a lot to do with women’s desire to look “white.”

    “The presumed ‘gold standard in rhinoplasty’ is a nose that is associated with being ‘Caucasian,’ meaning white: a tall, slender nose with a narrow nasal base,” Gulbas writes in her study, according to the Daily News.

    Gulbas, a research assistant...

    [more]
  • Anita Warren

    For almost three decades, the Hood Museum of Art has been a destination for visitors to quietly appreciate and reflect on the art and artifacts it has collected—from ancient to new, lovely to unsettling, commonplace to rare.

    Today, the museum boasts more than 70,000 objects. But it has never been just a larger-than-life-sized jewel box. Ever since Dartmouth consolidated its centuries-old collections under one...

    [more]

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