AIDS, NGOs, and Corruption: Inequality, Morality, and Patronage in Contemporary Nigeria

Dartmouth Events

AIDS, NGOs, and Corruption: Inequality, Morality, and Patronage in Contemporary Nigeria

AIDS, NGOs, and Corruption: Inequality, Morality, and Patronage in Contemporary Nigeria - Daniel Smith, Associate Professor, Brown University; Author of A Culture of Corruption: Everyday Deception and Popular Discontent in Nigeria

Monday, May 23, 2011
4:00pm-5:30pm
Rockefeller 2
Intended Audience(s): Public
Categories: Lectures & Seminars
In Nigeria, local AIDS organizations are widely seen as conduits for corruption, serving elite interests more than the people suffering from HIV and AIDS. But despite widespread cynicism about AIDS NGOs in general, local perceptions of particular NGOs and their leaders turn on assessments of conduct that complicate straightforward understandings of corruption. Drawing on two ethnographic case studies, this paper explores the intersecting dynamics of inequality, morality, and patronage as they play out in Nigerian NGOs that straddle local and global forces in the era of AIDS. Sponsored by the Robert A. 1925 and Catherine L. McKennan Fund for Anthropology, the African and African American Studies, the Women and Gender Studies Program, and the Dartmouth Coalition for Global Health.
Anthropology Department
Daniel Smith's website
For more information, contact:
Therese Perin-Deville
603-646-3256

Events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.