Symposia/Colloquia

Reading by poet Tsering Wangmo Dhompa

Please join the Department of Anthropology for the reading of Exile and Homecoming by Tibetan poet Tsering Wangmo Dhompa.

At 5 p.m. on Tuesday, May 8, 2018, Room 041, Kreindler Conference Room, Haldeman Center.

A conversation with filmmaker Kesang Tseten to follow.

Tsering Wangmo Dhompa is the author of three collections of poetry: My rice tastes like the lake, In the Absent Everyday, and Rules of the House (all from Apogee Press, Berkeley). My rice tastes like the lake was a finalist for the Northern California Independent Bookseller’s Book of the Year Award for 2012. Dhompa's first non-fiction book, Coming Home to Tibet, was published by Shambhala Publications in 2016. She teaches creative writing and is completing a PhD degree in Literature at the University of California in Santa Cruz where most recently she was the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Graduate Fellow on Non-citizenship 2016-17.

Lecture: "TRACES-OF-WHAT-ONE-DOES-NOT-KNOW"

João Biehl, Susan Dod Brown Professor of Anthropology and Woodrow Wilson School Faculty Associate at Princeton University presents "TRACES-OF-WHAT-ONE-DOES-NOT-KNOW" On the Retellings of a German-Brazilian Fratricide—The 19th Century Mucker [False Saints] War. 

Tuesday, May 08, 2018
4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Location: Carson L01

Lecture by Liza McAlister

Liza McAlister, Professor of Religion at Wesleyan University, presents: “The Militarization of Prayer and Evangelical Spiritual Warfare in Haiti
At 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 3, 2018, in Kemeny 006.

A network of global evangelicals understands the world to be a spiritual battleground in which they are the chosen warriors in Christ’s army. This talk draws on recent ethnographic fieldwork to look at how American prayer warriors train for the spiritual battlefield.  It describes how Americans engage evangelicals in Haiti to fight against the creole religious tradition called Vodou, which they consider a Satanic enemy. Spiritual warfare theologians and warriors imagine an invisible, more real realm with spiritual entities and legal codes that, once understood, can give a believer access to the same powers as Jesus Christ himself.

Trembling Mountain: a film by Kesang Tseten

Please join the Department of Anthropology and the Department of Film and Media Studies for the screening of Trembling Mountain, by Nepal's renowned film director Kesang Tseten.

At 7 p.m. on Tuesday, May 1, 2018, Loew Auditorium, Black Family Visual Arts Center.

Screening followed by a conversation with the filmmaker.

On April 25, 2015, the Himalayan country of Nepal experienced the first of several massive earth-quakes. This 7.8 event left nearly 9,000 people dead and more than 750,000 homes damaged or destroyed. One of the most affected areas was the Langtang Valley, in Rasuwa District. Here, an avalanche struck the community with half the force of an atomic bomb, killing more than 400 people and devastating the centuries-old village of pastoralists and farmers, which is also frequented by foreign trekkers. Kesang Tseten’s intimate film, Trembling Mountain, tells the story of disaster and survival, resilience and rebuilding in Langtang.

SAA 83rd Annual Meeting in Washington, DC

Chad Hill (Anthropology, Postdoctoral Scholar), Julie Hruby (Assoc. Prof., Classics), Jesse Casana (Associate Professor of Anthropology), Deborah Nichols (Professor of Anthropology), and Elise Laugier (EEES Graduate Student) were at this year Society for American Archaeology 83rd Annual Meeting in Washington, DC,  from April 11—15, 2018.

Click here for the Meeting full program information

 

 

Series on Environmental Archaeology Talks

The last of five lectures will take place on Tuesday, March 6, at 4:30 p.m., in Haldeman 041, sponsored by the Department of Anthropology and the Program in Ecology, Evolution, Ecosystems and Society (EEES):

"Microbial Archaeology, from the Microbiome to Milk"

Prof. Christina Warinner ( Max Planck Institute/Univ. of Oklahoma)

Light reception following in the Russo Gallery in Haldeman

Abstract:

Series on Environmental Archaeology - Lunchtime talks

The Department of Anthropology is pleased to present A Series on Environmental Archaeology. The fourth of five lectures will take place over lunch on February 1st at 12:30p in Haldeman 031.

"Environmental Archaeology and Late Holocene Lifeways of Southwest Madagascar"

Kristina Douglass
Asst. Professor of Anthropology
The Pennsylvania State University

Lunch will be provided by Anthropology and catered by Panera.

Series on Environmental Archaeology - Lunchtime talks

The Department of Anthropology is pleased to present A Series on Environmental Archaeology. The third of five lectures will take place over lunch on January 18th at 12:30p in Haldeman 031.

“The Effects of Climate Change on the Diet of Great Plains Paleoindians”

Erik Otárola-Castillo
Asst. Professor, Department of Anthropology
Purdue University

Series on Environmental Archaeology - Lunchtime talks

The Department of Anthropology is pleased to present A Series on Environmental Archaeology. The second of five lectures will take place over lunch on January 11th at 12:30p in Haldeman 125.

Spontaneity and Order in the Agricultural Hinterland of the Ancient North Coast of Peru

Ari Caramanica
PhD Candidate
Harvard University

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