Student News

Christina Danosi '13 publishes study of Samoan flying foxes

Christina Danosi '13, a modified Anthropology-Biological Sciences major, has published the results of her reading and research courses, Anthropology 85 and 87. Christina spent two quarters in 2012-2013 working with Amanda Melin - who was then a postdoctoral fellow, and is now an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis - and Associate Professor Nathaniel Dominy. Their study, which is published in the Journal of Comparative Physiology A (link), reports on the color vision (opsin) genes of Samoan flying foxes (Pteropus samoensis), a bat species with an anomalous proclivity for diurnal soaring and foraging.

Kes Schroer's takes her "Your Inner Chimpanzee's" class climbing

Joseph Blumberg

Students Go Climbing in the Footsteps of Chimpanzee

Dartmouth’s Kes Schroer has taken her students on an unusual adventure “in order to put themselves into the mind of a chimpanzee,” she says. “Chimpanzees provide a critical counterpoint for understanding the potential uniqueness of human behaviors.

Taking experiential learning to new heights, Schroer shepherded her class into the Daniels Climbing Gym. Enrolled in her course “Your Inner Chimpanzee,” they sought to emulate the experience of our cousins, with whom we share 98.8 percent of our DNA.

Student Studies Prehistoric Canals in a Mexican Metropolis

Joseph Blumberg

Adventures in Archaeology

Professor of Anthropology Deborah Nichols’ approach to education transcends the classroom. “For most students, college offers the first opportunity to take courses about archaeology,” she says. “For some, doing archaeology in the field will be a transformative experience. They learn to dig with trowels, toothbrushes, and lasers while having a legitimate excuse to get dirty.”

Nichols recently facilitated adventures in archaeology for four Dartmouth undergraduates. The students are profiled in this four-part Dartmouth Now series.

Andres Mejia-Ramon ’16 was born in Mexico, and considers Naucalpan, Mexico, and East Longmeadow, Mass., his hometowns. He says the main reason he became interested in archaeology is that he has been surrounded by the ancient Mesoamerican cultures for most of his life.

Undergraduate Searches for ‘Cultures Lost to Time’

Joseph Blumberg

Adventures in Archaeology

Professor of Anthropology Deborah Nichols’ approach to education transcends the classroom. “For most students, college offers the first opportunity to take courses about archaeology,” she says. “For some, doing archaeology in the field will be a transformative experience. They learn to dig with trowels, toothbrushes, and lasers while having a legitimate excuse to get dirty.”

Nichols recently facilitated adventures in archaeology for four Dartmouth undergraduates. The students are profiled in this four-part Dartmouth Now series.

Her first taste of archaeology came from a National Geographic article on Peru. By the time Genevieve Mifflin ’14 of Greenwich, Conn., had reached the tenth grade, she’d decided to major in anthropology in college.

“I must have been a senior in high school when I thought how amazing it must be to unveil cultures lost to time,” Mifflin says. “There was something about the mystery and intrigue of discovery that captivated me.”

Colin Quinn ’15 Digs for Clues About Ancient Nicaraguans

Joseph Blumberg

Adventures in Archaeology

Professor of Anthropology Deborah Nichols’ approach to education transcends the classroom. “For most students, college offers the first opportunity to take courses about archaeology,” she says. “For some, doing archaeology in the field will be a transformative experience. They learn to dig with trowels, toothbrushes, and lasers, while having a legitimate excuse to get dirty.”

Nichols recently facilitated adventures in archaeology for four Dartmouth undergraduates. The students are profiled in this four-part Dartmouth Now series.

It was his high school track and field coach who first got Colin Quinn ’15 hooked on archaeology. Conversations with Coach Jason Paling at Nashua (N.H.) High School South revealed the athlete’s archaeological avocation. Paling is co-principal investigator on the Chiquilistagua archaeological project with Justin Lowry, an instructor at George Mason University. The site, southwest of the Nicaragua capital city of Managua, is located on land owned by Paling’s in-laws.

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