Tacking and Tangling: Cosmologies of Mobility in the Haitian Caribbean

Jeff Kahn
May 8, 2015

Canny smugglers, daring migrants, and entrepreneurial spirits all combine to populate the mystically infused land- and seascapes of the Haitian imagination. This talk will examine Haitian cosmologies of mobility and wealth in the wider Caribbean and the alternative visions of circulating value they conjure in the face of external efforts to police and contain the perceived threat of Haitian biological and social disorder.

Currently a Weatherhead Fellow at Harvard University and Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of California Davis, Professor Kahn has had a longstanding interest in Haiti, going back to his Dartmouth honors thesis in 2001 on Haitian religious pilgrimage and vodou.  He subsequently earned his Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of Chicago and his JD from Yale Law School.  His research centers on the anthropology of law and the state, sovereignty, migration, border policing.

The Evolution of Human Behavior: Recent Perspectives from the Middle Pleistocene at Olorgesailie, Kenya

Alison Brooks and John Yellen
May 1, 2015
Alison S. Brooks (George Washington University) and John E Yellen (National Science Foundation) are members of the Smithsonian’s Human Origins Program and its Olorgesailie Research Project, both led by Rick Potts. 

Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: The Hiddenness of Migrant Farmworkers and Global Inequities

Seth Holmes, MD
Assistant Professor, Public Health and Medical Anthropology
University of California, Berkley

April 6th, 2015
Rockefeller Center 003
4:30 - 6:00 p.m.

Dr. Seth M. Holmes is a cultural anthropologist and physician whose work focuses broadly on social hierarchies, health inequalities, and the ways in which such inequalities are naturalized and normalized in society and in health care. He is Co-Director of the MD/PhD Track in Medical Anthropology coordinated between UCSF and UC Berkley and Director of the Berkley Center for Social Medicine.

Recalculating Wall Street Rationalities: A Rethinking of Financial Risk and 'Risk Culture'

Karen Ho
Associate Professor of Anthropologya
University of Minnesota

April 13th, 2015
Rockefeller Center, 002
3:30 - 5:00 p.m.

Karen Ho is a cultural anthropologist specializing in the anthropology of finance, globalization, and capitalism. She received her BA and MA from Stanford University and her Ph.D. in anthropology from Princeton University. She is author of Liquidated: An Ethnography of Wall Street (Duke, 2009) based on work as both investment banker and researcher. Her talk will extend her work on the organizational culture of risk on Wall Street that stresses enhancing shareholder value but also generates corporate instabilities magnified by market dynamics and rhythms.

Vivek Venkataraman, PhD Student in EEB, Receives NGS Waitt Grant

Vivek Venkataraman (Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Ph.D student) and Jeff Kerby (Visiting Arctic Fellow at Dartmouth College) received a National Geographic Society - Waitt Grant for $15,000 for a project entitled "The living library of primate faces: developing 3-dimensional facial mapping to link behavioral ecology and morphometrics in a wild gelada monkey population."  The size and shape of morphological traits are fundamental aspects of animals that have been shaped by natural and sexual selection. Consequently, the measurements of physical attributes in wild animals is essential for testing evolutionary hypotheses. Yet in most taxa this task is difficult due to logistical challenges and the ethical problems associated with live capture. Remote measurement of individual morphological traits via photogrammetry has become popular in recent years, although current implementations of this technique remain relatively crude and are largely confined to two dimensions.   The study involves developing a portable multi-camera array to characterize the morphological traits of wild primates in three dimensions.

Colin Walmsley '15 Named Rhodes Scholar

Colin Walmsley ’15 of Fort MacLeod, Alberta, Canada has been named a Rhodes Scholar for 2015—the 78th Rhodes Scholar in Dartmouth’s history.

The Rhodes Scholarship, the oldest and best-known award for international study, is widely considered to be the most prestigious postgraduate academic award available to college graduates.

Colin is completing a double major in Anthropology and Government and conducted research as a senior fellow on "Queer Youth Homelessness in New York City," with his advisor, Sienna Craig, an associate professor of Anthropology. His research was supported with funding from the anthropology department’s Claire Garber Goodman Fund for the Anthropological Study of Human Culture.

The Anthropology Department extends its warmest congratulations to Colin as he prepares for his journey to Oxford to pursue a master's degree in Social Anthropology.

Karolina Krelinova '14 Wins Runner-Up Chase Peace Prize

The Anthropology Department congratulates anthropology major Karolina Krelinova ’14, who has been awarded the 2014 Runner-Up Prize by the John Sloan Dickey Center’s Chase Peace Prize committee. Each year, the Dickey Center awards the Peace Prize and Runner-Up Prize to senior theses or culminating projects that address “the subject of war, conflict resolution, the prospects and problems of maintaining peace, or other related topics”

As an Anthropology major, Karolina conducted independent ethnographic research among young activists in Belgrade, Serbia. Her research, advised by Professors Sergei Kan and Lourdes Gutierrez-Najera, culminated in an honors thesis titled “Challenging The Mythical Nation: Liberal Youth Activism in Belgrade, Serbia.”

What Americans Can Learn From a Vial of Tibetan Spit

Tibetans have developed unique biological traits to adjust to life at high altitude, and assessing these genetic differences may benefit all of us. Associate Professor Sienna Craig and colleague Cynthia Beall are working to understand the role that these unique genes may play in “the biology of diseases as diverse as osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis, heart failure, and cancer.”

Craig writes about these biological discoveries, as well as the challenges of translating medical science between Tibetan and American cultures, in a recent article in Pacific Standard.

To access the full article, click here.

Miriam Kilimo ’14 Named Rhodes Scholar

Miriam Jerotich Kilimo ’14 of Nairobi, Kenya, has been named a Rhodes Scholar for 2015—the 76th Rhodes Scholar in Dartmouth’s history.

The Rhodes Scholarship, the oldest and best-known award for international study, is widely considered to be the most prestigious postgraduate academic award available to college graduates.

While at Dartmouth, Miriam majored in Anthropology and conducted research as a senior fellow on "Inter-Ethnic Friendship Among Youth in Urban Kenya," with her advisor, Sergei Kan, a professor of Anthropology and Native American Studies.

The Anthropology Department extends its warmest congratulations to Miriam as she heads to Oxford to pursue a master's degree in Women's Studies.

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