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Discover what our Majors and Minors are doing. Read about their achievements and their research here.

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2016

MAY 11TH AND 12TH

This year’s presentations will begin on Wednesday afternoon at 2:00 p.m. and continue until 5:00 p.m. Presentations will resume the following day at 2:00 p.m.

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2015

Hannah McGehee '15 - Living with Fibromyalgia: Communicating Pain through Oral Narrative and Creative Expression

Despite an increasing rate of fibromyalgia diagnosis around the world, the lived experience of fibromyalgia, particularly in young women, is not well understood. As such, this project aims to answer the following questions: How does communication between the voices of women living with chronic pain and the authoritative voice of medicine result in and affect the medical and social diagnoses of fibromyalgia? How do gender, age, and the cultural construction of illness and pain play into this process? How can auto-ethnography, biography, and creative expression be used to understand this process from the lived experience perspective? Drawing on previous work in anthropology, art, and medicine, in addition to my personal experiences with fibromyalgia, I gathered and analyzed stories of young women attending universities in Colorado and New Hampshire. In addition to these oral narratives, I explored the use of creative expression to convey the lived experience of fibromyalgia. The final products of this project include both written and creative components; together, these products will serve to enhance the understanding and acceptance of the lived experience of fibromyalgia for healthcare providers, lay people, and young women with fibromyalgia.   
Advisor: Sienna Craig

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2015

Katie Williamson '15 - Exploring Sustainable Communities and the Ecovillage Model at Cobb Hill Cohousing Community

Advisors: Kenneth Bauer and Laura Ogden

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2015

Aylin Woodward '15 - New methods to Infer Medial Longitudinal Columnmorphology in the Hominin foot

Diagram of the Talus or Ankle Bone
Advisor: Nathaniel Dominy

 

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2015

Andrés Mejía-Ramón '16 - Local Hydrology in Teotihuacan: A Study of Ancient Canals and Water Basins

The ancient city of Teotihuacan, located about 45 km northeast of modern Mexico City, was the dominant political, economic, and cultural center during the Early Classic period (200-600 CE) in Mesoamerica. With over 125,000 inhabitants relying on intensive agriculture, Teotihuacan was the largest city in the prehispanic New World. Although Teotihuacan is arguably one of the most studied ancient megalithic cities in the world, limited research has been done in investigating the ways its manipulated its hydrology. While it is known  that  irrigation canals  were built,  streams were diverted, and drainage canals were constructed to control flooding, the extent and specifics of this are not very well understood, as over time, most canals have been buried. An understanding of the local hydrology would give clues as to the agricultural workings of this ancient city—a question that still requires much research—and may yield further insight into the social, political, and economic organization of this ancient city-state. The proposed research would seek to confirm the presence of buried canals initially using aerial photography and ground penetrating radar, culminating with an excavation to confirm and date the canals. Afterwards, more of the valley would be analyzed using imagery in order to further understand the layout of Pre-Columbian Teotihuacan and its irrigation systems.
Advisor: Deborah Nichols

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2015

Tom Kraft and Vivek Venkataraman - Batek then and now: Genealogy and Social Network Structure across four Decades in Kelantan and Pahang

Kirk Endicott collected data on the foraging economics and cooperative behavior of Batek hunter-gatherers at the individual level over a 91-day period in the 1970s. Data collected at such a fine temporal scale provides a unique opportunity to address two questions in human behavioral ecology using new quantitative tools in social network analysis. First, what network properties correlate with reproductive success and what light does this shed on the nature of the causal relationship between foraging success and reproductive success? Second, what social and ecological factors explain cooperative tendencies during foraging? To address these questions, we propose to synthesize new data drawn from ethnographic fieldwork in Malaysia (collecting genealogical data) with Dr. Endicott’s data from the 1970s.
Advisors: Kirk Endicott and Nathaniel Dominy

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2015

Danielle Moore '15 - Black Beyond Borders: The Roles of Race and Socio- Economic Status in Dartmouth Off-Campus Programs


Advisor: Laura Ogden

 

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2015

Aaron Ellis '15 - What is Craft? Regionalism and Identity within the American Craft Beer Revolution

This thesis is focused on the Craft Beer Revolution, the regionalism within the United States’ craft beer culture (taste and place), and trying to understand “What is craft?” Craft breweries have had an explosive growth over the past forty years, resulting in an amazing diversity within the Craft Beer Revolution in terms of regional trends in beer styles and across differences in size and scale of production and distribution. “Craft” has to do with the identity of the brewers who are in search of a “good beer” and is produced in direct contrast to the commercially available beers that most people consume if not prefer. Craft breweries thus contrast themselves with “Big Beer” not only in terms of how the beer they produce tastes but also in terms of the size and scale of a brewery’s production and distribution. Craft also has a definition for consumers who recognize craft as a “good beer” that is different from what they are used to. In order to be recognized as “craft,” brewers use ingredients that are regionally available to them to make a “good beer,” which creates regional variation in beer production. Once a brewery starts production of a “good beer” they must face issues of what size to grow to, how this affects their flexibility to produce what they want, where to distribute, and how to maintain this standard of a “good beer.”
Advisor: John Watanabe

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2015

Lindsey Lam '15 - Child’s Play and Cultural Change in Huaycan, Peru

My research focused on child’s play, and what the various aspects of play can tell us about cultural shifts, class distinctions, and even economic outlooks of the people of Huaycán, an urbanizing shantytown community in Lima, Peru. In recent years, anthropological work done on children’s activities has revealed connections between the different ways in which children play and cultural  characteristics  of  their communities,  socioeconomic stratification, and parents’ expectations for children’s eventual roles in adult society. Huaycán, home to highland migrants and descendants of migrants, is a community ripe with fast-paced cultural change with the influx of new technologies and Western media in which children’s prospects of financial security and prosperity hope to transcend the often poverty-stricken pasts of their parents. By looking at aspects of play – including but not limited to level of competitiveness, gender difference, level of imagination (when “playing pretend”), difference in play between socioeconomic classes, and incorporation of technology and media – in local streets, playgrounds, homes, and sports fields in Huaycán, interviewing children, and interviewing parents, I hope to understand how children in Huaycán interpret, transgress, and aspire to future roles in the social world around them.
Advisor: John Watanabe

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2015

Colin Walmsley '15 - Queer Youth Homelessness in New York City

This research project aims to explore the lived experiences of LGBT homeless youth in New York City. LGBT homeless youth are one of contemporary society’s most marginalized and disenfranchised groups. However, despite a substantial amount of public health research on LGBT homeless youth that has revealed distinct behavioral differences between queer and heterosexual youth, there has been very little research that has focused on the lived experiences, worldviews, and culture of queer homeless youth. As such, I propose to conduct an in-depth, ethnographic study exploring the lived experiences of LGBT homeless youth in New York City. Using research methods such as participant observation, interviews, and social mapping exercises, I will gather data on identity and community formation, power dynamics, family ties and kinship, networks of exchange, and perceptions of risk among queer homeless youth in New York City. Using qualitative coding strategies, I will then analyze this data to develop better understandings of queer homeless youth worldviews and perspectives.
Advisor: Sienna Craig

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2015

Colin Quinn '15 - Chiquilistagua Archaeological Project: A Settlement Study along the Pre-Columbian Corridors in Nicaragua

The Chiquilistagua Archaeological Project was conducted during the 2013 Summer term in Chiquilistagua, Nicaragua. I participated in field studies as an active member of the archaeological team at the site, under Jason Paling and Justin Lowry. During the excavations I recovered obsidian artifacts to later analyze at Dartmouth in the Fall. Upon arrival back to campus in Fall of 2013, I conducted analysis of obsidian collected at Chiquilistagua. Information will be gathered from visual characteristics and chemical finger printing of the obsidian in order to understand the trade network that operated in Chiquilistagua during the Sapoa period (800-1250 AD). After analysis, I will complete a research report on the findings, which may later be included in a senior thesis. The project will allow me to participate in field work in a quickly developing region of the world with a bright future in archaeology and anthropology.
Advisor: Deborah Nichols
 

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2014

Archana Ramanujam: Race, Gender and Markedness: Identity Construction at Dartmouth College

This thesis explores how women construct their identities at Dartmouth College around the concepts of race and gender. From narratives of senior women, I discuss how a spectrum of 'markedness' emerges around women's race and gender. I show that at one end of the spectrum, gender becomes the primary identity or 'master status', at the other end race becomes 'master status,' and a more intersectional identity falls in between these two extremes.
Advisor: Lauren Gulbas

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2014

Gillian Britton: Microbial adaptations facilitate non-ruminant Theropithecus gelada grazing behavior in northern Ethiopia

Microbiomes refer to microbial communities, including their genomes and environmental contexts and associations. My work examined effects of inheritance and diet on the gut microbial communities of three baboon populations-Papio hamadryas, P. anubis, P. hamadryas x anubis-in Awash, Ethiopia and a population of Theropithecus gelada in Guassa, Ethiopia. Over the summer of 2011 I travelled to Ethiopia and spent a month camping in national parks, following baboon populations and collecting fecal samples for DNA extraction. Advisor: Nathaniel Dominy

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2014

Vivek Venkataraman: Dental Ecology of a Grass-Eating Primate

Chewing efficiency has been associated with fitness in several mammals, yet little is known about the behavioral, ecological, and morphological factors that influence chewing efficiency in wild animals. In northern Ethiopia we measured chewing efficiency in gelada baboons, the only extant grass-eating primate. Chewing efficiency varied according to the toughness of consumed foods and the degree of tooth wear. Despite consuming tough diets, geladas have the highest chewing efficiencies thus measured in primates.
Advisor: Nathaniel Dominy

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2014

Adam Kraus: Exclusion and Incorporation: The Changing Healthscapes of the Rural Highland Indigenous in Peru's Sacred Valley of the Inca

How do sociocultural, historical, and political factors shape healthcare opportunities available to and utilized by individuals? After characterizing these individualized health landscapes, this thesis deconstructs perceived dichotomies and explores race, indigeneity, and the "modern" to elucidate a discursive relationship between inclusion and exclusion from larger systems. Ultimately, this analysis informs potential solutions to improve healthcare for the highland indigenous people in the Sacred Valley of the Inca in Peru.
Advisors: Alan Covey, Sienna Craig

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2014

Christine Ryu: Maintaining Cosmic Order: Mexica Offerings from Maize to Humans

The Mexica, the dominant ruling group of the Aztec Empire, believed in cosmic cycles of creation and destruction which would lead to the end of their world. In order to delay this end, the Mexica dedicated offerings to their deities, who were capable of maintaining the cosmic order. My thesis integrates the wide variety of offerings across rituals and deities to explore the connections between items and with other aspects of Mexica life.
Advisor: Deborah Nichols

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2014

Ben Nguyen: Self-Ethnography of a Marshallese Health Crisis: An Anthropological Study in Health Education

Over the course of ten weeks, Ben's project involved the processes of ethnography, film, and survey in the hopes of developing better understandings of Marshallese people living in the capital of the Marshall Islands, Majuro. With the use of local research assistants and key contacts of all backgrounds around the coral atoll, Ben was able to develop findings into the Marshallese culture in regards to structures and relationships regarding food, land, social relationships, diet, and health. This project culminated with the production of research reports that were sent around the atoll to local Marshallese as well as facilitators for development in the Marshall Islands. Additionally Ben was able to complete a short film by the name of 'Jouj Eo, Mour Eo' (meaning Kindness is Life). Advisor: John Watanabe

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2014

Victoria Trump Redd: Cultural Health and the Emerging Middle Class in Carabayllo, Peru

This thesis focuses on members of the emerging middle class in Carabayllo, Lima, Peru. I explore how the struggle for upward socioeconomic mobility, and the new social, economic, and moral dilemmas this brings, have affected them in terms of their "cultural health". This reflects the linkages between individual, family, and community, and affects people's mental, physical, and social health. Aspects of cultural health are seen in consumerism, individualism, insecurity, health effects of stress, and goals of educated youth.
Advisor: John Watanabe.

Goodman and Honors Presentations 2014

Karolina Krelinova: Challenging the mythical nation: Liberal Youth Activism in Belgrade, Serbia

This thesis examines the role of youth in the ongoing struggle between nationalism and socio-cultural Westernization in the post-Socialist world. Specifically, it explores how Serbian liberal youth oppose and strategically reconstruct the dominant national(ist) narratives to promote their agendas within the transitioning society. Based on ethnographic research conducted among the Belgrade-based liberal youth activists in 2013, this thesis explores the activists' deeply personal as well as collective struggles to reframe history, conflict, myth, and nation. Advisors: Sergei Kan, Lourdes Gutiérrez Nájera